Events - Summit 2016

ABOUT OUR SUMMIT

The Help Group’s Summit 2016 is a cutting edge conference that features leading experts in basic and applied research, and evidence-based best practices in assessment, intervention and treatment. Widely recognized for the scope, depth and caliber of its offerings, the Summit is designed for educators, clinicians/therapists and parents. Each year, the program provides a rich and informative experience to its attendees. We look forward to you joining us.

SUMMIT CHAIRS

REGISTRATION

 

 

room

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Matthew State, MD, PhD
Oberndorf Family Distinguished Professor
Chair, Department of Psychiatry,
UCSF School of Medicine
Director, Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute and Hospital

Thomas E. Brown, PhD
Director of the Brown Clinic for Attention & Related Disorders
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck Medical Center of USC

Kevin Pelphrey, PhD
Carbonell Family Professor in Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Director, Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute, The George Washington University

Maryanne Wolf, PhD
John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship & Public Service
Director, Center for Reading and Language Research, Tufts University
 

LOCATION

HOTEL RECOMMENDATIONS
LUXE HOTEL
For Reservations Call 310.476.6571
11461 Sunset Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90049

ACCESSIBILITY
The Help Group is committed to making Summit 2016 accessible to all individuals. If you anticipate needing assistance while at the conference, please contact events@thehelpgroup.org, no later than October, 3.

COMPLIMENTARY EVENT PARKING
Renowned for its architectural design and naturalistic setting, the Skirball Cultural Center is a unique and inviting site for a conference. Located on more than 15 acres, it has been home to The Help Group’s Summit for the past nine years.

SUMMIT 2016 REFUND DISCLAIMER
The Help Group reserves the right to change elements of the Summit. Refunds will be made if a written request is received by October 7, 2016. Registration fees will be refunded less a $25.00 processing charge.  No refunds will be made after October 7, 2016.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

 

7:00 AM – 7:45 AM

Registration & Continental Breakfast

 

7:45 AM – 8:00 AM

Opening Proceedings

 

8:00 AM – 9:15 AM

 

1A Autism Genetics: Where are We Headed

Matthew State, MD, PhD

Oberndorf Family Distinguished Professor

Chair, Department of Psychiatry, UCSF School of Medicine

Director, Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute and Hospital

 

 

9:15 AM – 10:30 AM

 

2A The Role of Executive Functioning in Young People with ADHD and/or Asperger’s as They Transition to Post-Secondary Schooling or Workplace

Thomas E. Brown, PhD

Director of the Brown Clinic for Attention & Related Disorders

Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck Medical Center of USC

 

2B Toward Understanding Girls with Autism: A Researcher & Parent Perspective

Kevin Pelphrey, PhD

Carbonell Family Professor in Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Director, Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute, The George Washington University

 

10:30 AM -10:45 AM Break*

 

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

 

3A Dating Do’s & Don’ts: Evidence-Based Strategies for Developing Romantic Relationships for Adults with Social Challenges

Elizabeth Laugeson, PsyD

Director, The Help Group – UCLA Autism Research Alliance

Assistant Clinical Professor, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA

Founder & Director, UCLA PEERS Clinic

 

3B Early Identification in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Sally Ozonoff, PhD

Endowed Professor

Vice Chair for Research

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

UC Davis MIND Institute

 

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM Lunch*

 

1:00 PM – 2:15 PM

 

4A Anxiety in Children with ADHD and Learning Disabilities

John Piacentini, PhD, ABPP

Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine

Director, Child OCD, Anxiety, and Tic Disorders Program, UCLA Semel Institute

 

4B Cognitive and Socio-emotional Resilience in individuals with Dyslexia

Fumiko Hoeft MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences

Director, Hoeft Laboratory for Educational Neuroscience, UCSF


4C Optimizing Services for Bicultural and Bilingual Latino Children with Special Needs and their Families

Xavier E. Cagigas, PhD

Director, Cultural Neuropsychology Initiative

Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences

David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

 

2:15 PM – 3:30 PM

 

5A Translating Scientific Research into Real World Practice: The Help Group – UCLA Autism Research Alliance

The Help Group-UCLA Autism Research Alliance

Mirella Dapretto, PhD

Professor, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences &

UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment &

Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA

 

Amanda Gulsrud, PhD

Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry

Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA

 

Elizabeth Laugeson, PsyD

Director, The Help Group – UCLA Autism Research Alliance

 

Katherine Stavropoulos, PhD

Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education

University of California, Riverside

 

5B Assessment and Treatment of Feeding and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with ASD

William G. Sharp, PhD

Director, Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program, The Marcus Autism Center

Assistant Professor, Division of Autism and Related Disorders &

Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

Emory University School of Medicine

 

5C Pharmacological Management of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Michael Enenbach, MD

Associate Clinical Professor

Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, UCLA

 

3:30 PM – 3:45 PM Break*

 

3:45 PM – 5:00 PM

 

6A How the Reading Brain Reframes our Concept of Dyslexia and Its Intervention

Maryanne Wolf, PhD

John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship & Public Service

Director, Center for Reading and Language Research, Tufts University

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15

 

7:00 AM – 8:15 AM

Registration & Continental Breakfast

 

8:15AM – 9:30 AM

 

1A Rethinking ADD/ADHD: How It Develops, Sometimes Gets Better and Sometimes Gets Worse

Thomas E. Brown, PhD

Director of the Brown Clinic for Attention & Related Disorders

Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck Medical Center of USC

 

1B Harnessing Affinities to Gain an Understanding of Autism

Kevin Pelphrey, PhD

Carbonell Family Professor in Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Director, Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute, The George Washington University

 

9:30 AM -10:45 AM

 

2A Outside the Box: Non-Traditional Approaches to Treating ADHD

Diane M. Danis, MD, MPH

Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrician, Private Practice

 

2B Sleep Disturbances in Children with ASD: Symptoms and Treatment Strategies

William G. Sharp, PhD

Director, Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program, The Marcus Autism Center

Assistant Professor, Division of Autism and Related Disorders &

Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

Emory University School of Medicine

 

10:45 AM -11:00 Break*

 

11:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

 

3A STEM and Special Needs—A Revolution in Special Education

Ellis Crasnow, PhD

Director, STEM³ Academy and STEM Education

The Help Group

 

3B A Community-based Clinician’s Perspective on Evidence-based Priorities in ASD Management

Anshu Batra, MD, FAAP

Developmental Pediatrician, Private Practice

 

3C Adapting Social & Sensory Environments in the Classroom, Clinic and Community for Children with Autism

Mary Lawlor, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Associate Chair of Research, USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Professor, joint appointment, Keck School of Medicine, USC

 

Olga Solomon, PhD

Assistant Professor, USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

 

Leah Stein Duker, PhD, OTR/L

Research Assistant Professor, USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

 

12:00 NOON – 1:00 PM

 

4A Using Neuropsychological Assessment to Help Children with Learning Difficulties Thrive: A Guide for Parents, Educators and Clinicians

Claudia L. Kernan, PhD

Director, The Help Group – UCLA Nueropsychology Program

Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences

David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

 

4B Autism Early Intervention Doesn’t End at Age 3

Jason Bolton, PsyD

Vice President of Programs

The Help Group


Tanya Paparella, PhD

Director, Early Childhood Partial Hospitalization Program

Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor, UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment

David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

 

Sara McCracken, PsyD, BCBA

Director, Early Elementary Programs

The Help Group

 

4C Building Resilience for Children with Special Needs

Catherine Mogil, PsyD

Clinical Director, Family Stress, Trauma and Resilience Clinic, UCLA Nathanson Family Resilience Center

Assistant Clinical Professor, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA

 

*Breaks and Lunch are not counted towards CE Credit.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

 

7:00 AM – 7:45 AM

Registration & Continental Breakfast

 

7:45 AM – 8:00 AM

Opening Proceedings

 

8:00 AM – 9:15 AM

 

Matthew State, MD, PhD

Oberndorf Family Distinguished Professor
Chair, Department of Psychiatry, UCSF School of Medicine
Director, Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute and Hospital

Autism Genetics: Where Are We Headed

Recent advances in high throughput genomic technologies, coupled with large patient cohorts and an evolving culture of rapid data sharing have led to remarkable advances in the understanding of the genetics of autism spectrum disorders. To date, the lion’s share of this progress has been with regard to the contribution of rare spontaneous mutations, both in DNA sequence and chromosomal structure. The ability now to reliably and systematically identify ASD risk genes provides important initial insights into both the opportunities as well as the challenges the field now faces in moving from gene discovery to an actionable understanding of the mechanisms underlying these complex common neurodevelopmental syndromes. The lecture will provide an overview of what is now known about the specific risk mutations associated with ASD, address the particular challenges posed by the discovery of mutations that have large biological effect but low population frequency, and consider the role that whole genome sequencing will play in the near future in enhancing the understanding of the developmental aspects of ASD risk.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Understand the importance of spontaneous (de novo) mutations for gene discovery in autism

2. Identify specific genes and genomic regions that increase the risk for this syndrome

3. Understand the rationale for genomic testing in individuals presenting with ASD

 

9:15 AM – 10:30 AM

 

Thomas E. Brown, PhD
Director of the Brown Clinic for Attention & Related Disorders
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck Medical Center of USC

The Role of Executive Functioning in Young People with ADHD and/or Asperger’s as They Transition to Post-Secondary Schooling or Workplace

The transition from secondary to post-secondary schooling is a major life transition for all students, but it tends to be especially difficult for students with ADD/ADHD and/or Asperger’s. Moving from the familiar structure and supports of high school into post-secondary settings brings increased demands for self-management dependent on executive functions. This presentation will describe how parents, teachers and clinicians can help these students to prepare for and cope with critical challenges in this life-shaping transition.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Identify the role of executive functions in meeting critical challenges of the transition from secondary to post-secondary schooling

2. Recognize how students with ADD/ADHD and Asperger’s can be helped to prepare themselves for these challenges

3. Describe strategies that may be useful if these students are struggling to cope with challenges of post-secondary schooling

 

Kevin Pelphrey, PhD
Carbonell Family Professor in Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Director, Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute, The George Washington University

Toward Understanding Girls with Autism: A Researcher & Parent Perspective

This presentation will discuss recent work from our group focused on using neuroimaging and genetics to understand how autism manifests differently in girls as compared to boys.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Describe sex differences in autism

2. Understand how the study of brain function can help predict treatment success

3. Identify the ways in which neural science is helping to refine the development of novel interventions for people with autism across the lifespan

 

10:30 AM -10:45 AM Break*

 

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

 

Elizabeth Laugeson, PsyD
Director, The Help Group – UCLA Autism Research Alliance
Assistant Clinical Professor, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA
Founder & Director, UCLA PEERS Clinic

Dating Do’s & Don’ts: Evidence-Based Strategies for Developing Romantic Relationships for Adults with Social Challenges

Based on the model used in the UCLA PEERS program, attendees will be given an overview of evidence-based strategies for developing and maintaining romantic relationships for adults with ASD and other social challenges.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Understand the social challenges related to developing romantic relationships for adults with ASD

2. Become familiar with ecologically valid strategies of dating etiquette

3. Become familiar with the evidence-based strategies for teaching dating etiquette to adults with ASD

 

Sally Ozonoff, PhD
Endowed Professor
Vice Chair for Research
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
UC Davis MIND Institute

Early Identification in Autism Spectrum Disorder

This talk focuses on early diagnosis of ASD in infants and toddlers and will summarize existing research, as well as provide practical guidance for assessment strategies and working clinically with families.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Identify why early identification of ASD is critical

2. Understand what screening and diagnostic tools are recommended

3. Be able to differentiate early signs of ASD from normal variants or behaviors indicative of non-ASD outcomes

 

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM Lunch*

 

1:00 PM -2:15 PM

 

John Piacentini, PhD, ABPP
Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine
Director, Child OCD, Anxiety, and Tic Disorders Program, UCLA Semel Institute

Anxiety in Children with ADHD and Learning Disabilities

This presentation will provide an overview of the most common childhood anxiety disorders, how to recognize anxiety disorders in children with ADHD and learning disabilities, and describe the most common approaches for effectively treating youth with anxiety plus ADHD/LD.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Recognize anxiety symptoms in children with ADHD and LDs

2. Differentiate these symptoms from ADHD and LD symptoms

3. Describe typical treatment approaches for anxiety symptoms in ASD and LD youth

 

Fumiko Hoeft MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences
Director, Hoeft Laboratory for Educational Neuroscience, UCSF

Cognitive and Socio-emotional Resilience in Individuals with Dyslexia

This talk will address the importance of an integrated approach in understanding all children but in particular, those with learning disabilities such as dyslexia: from genetics and brain networks to behavior, from reading to socio-emotional skills, and from risk to protective factors.  We discuss the latest advances in the neuroscience of dyslexia, with an emphasis on cognitive and socio-emotional resilience. We propose a resilience model that incorporates cognitive factors that prevent at-risk children from developing dyslexia, as well as cognitive and socio-emotional factors that promote children with dyslexia to have good functional outcome such as positive psychosocial adjustment and strong reading comprehension. In turn, it is likely that good functional outcome will further strengthen resilience.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Understand the latest neuroscience findings in dyslexia and learning disabilities

2. Identify the concept of cognitive resilience and factors that lead to good functional outcome

3. Describe how socio-emotional character traits are important in learning


Xavier E. Cagigas, PhD

Director, Cultural Neuropsychology Initiative
Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences
David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

Optimizing Services for Bicultural and Bilingual Latino Children with Special Needs and their Families
 
In this presentation we will discuss the unique challenges and limited English proficiency Latino children and their families face when needing assessment and intervention for special needs.
 

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Identify current federal provisions of services to LEP children and families
2. Appreciate the need for linguistically and culturally concordant care and its relationship to outcomes
3. Understand the rationale for why assessment and intervention is predicated on culturally and linguistically responsive

 

2:15 PM – 3:30 PM

 

Mirella Dapretto, PhD

Professor, Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences &

UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment &

Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA

 

Amanda Gulsrud, PhD

Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry

Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA

 

Elizabeth Laugeson, PsyD

Director, The Help Group – UCLA Autism Research Alliance

 

Katherine Stavropoulos, PhD

Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education

University of California, Riverside

Translating Scientific Research into Real World Practice: The Help Group – UCLA Autism Research Alliance

The Help Group-UCLA Autism Research Alliance

This session will provide an overview of research being conducted through The Help Group – UCLA Autism Research Alliance, an innovative partnership between The Help Group and the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, dedicated to enhancing and expanding clinical research in the education and treatment of those on the autism spectrum.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Understand the unique challenges faced by youth with ASD in the academic setting

2. Be able to provide an overview of evidence-based methods of instruction to improve social outcomes for youth with ASD

3. Gain knowledge about empirically supported techniques for helping support youth with ASD

 

William G. Sharp, PhD
Director, Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program, The Marcus Autism Center
Assistant Professor, Division of Autism and Related Disorders &
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition
Emory University School of Medicine

Assessment and Treatment of Feeding and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with ASD

Children with ASD have a fivefold increase in the odds of developing a feeding problem compared with peers. While there is a well-established evidence base regarding the assessment and treatment of feeding concerns in other pediatric populations, the unique behavioral and developmental profile associated with ASD often necessitates adaptation to existing methods and techniques. A detailed summary of behavioral treatment will be presented, with an emphasis on combining antecedent and consequence-based procedures to develop highly specific treatment packages that balance addressing the operant function of behavior while ameliorating possible side effects associated with the introduction of treatment. Treatment planning for home, clinic, and school-based intervention will be highlighted.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Describe food selectivity and related mealtime concerns in ASD

2. Identity medical outcomes and nutrition issues associated with atypical patterns of intake

3. Recognize possible contributing factors, focusing on evidence of gastrointestinal (GI) concerns in ASD

4. Identify appropriate interventions for feeding disorders in ASD based on the severity of the presenting problem.

5. This includes parent consultation/education, nutritional guidance, behavioral therapy, medical interventions, and intense inpatient services.

 

Michael Enenbach, MD
Associate Clinical Professor
Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, UCLA

Pharmacological Management of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

A review of medications commonly prescribed in Autism and ADHD for providers and parents.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Have a basic understanding of medications commonly used in Autism and ADHD

2. Have a basic understanding of comorbid conditions with ASD targeted with medication

3. Have a basic understanding of evidence-based on-label vs. off-label medications used in these populations

 

3:30 PM – 3:45 PM Break*

 

3:45 PM – 5:00 PM

 

Maryanne Wolf, PhD
John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship & Public Service
Director, Center for Reading and Language Research, Tufts University

How the Reading Brain Reframes our Concept of Dyslexia and Its Intervention

Dr. Wolf will describe principles of the reading brain circuit’s development in the species and in the child. These principles are the basis for an alternative conceptualization of dyslexia and a circuit-based approach to intervention. Implications of digital culture on reading development will be discussed.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Know the basic principles underlying the development of the reading brain circuit and the major impediments to its formation in children with dyslexia and in other struggling readers

2. Understand comprehensive interventions for struggling readers with an emphasis arising from digital culture influences on attention and memory

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15

7:00 AM – 8:15 AM

Registration & Continental Breakfast

 

8:15 AM – 9:30 AM

 

Thomas E. Brown, PhD
Director of the Brown Clinic for Attention & Related Disorders
Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck Medical Center of USC

Rethinking ADD/ADHD: How It Develops, Sometimes Gets Better and Sometimes Gets Worse

Recent research has challenged many assumptions about how ADD/ADHD develops across the lifespan. There is now evidence that some individuals with this disorder in childhood improve considerably by early adulthood, while some who showed no signs of ADD/ADHD in childhood begin to develop impairing symptoms of the disorder as adolescents, young adults or later. This presentation will describe the complex role of emotions and executive functions in ADD/ADHD, offering examples of factors that may influence its getting better and/or getting worse.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Understand recent changes in understanding ADD/ADHD across the lifespan

2. Identify key elements of emotions and executive functions in ADHD

3. Describe factors that may influence when and how ADD/ADHD gets worse or better

 

Kevin Pelphrey, PhD
Carbonell Family Professor in Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Director, Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Institute, The George Washington University

Harnessing Affinities to Gain an Understanding of Autism

This presentation will discuss the ways in which we are using the incredibly motivating strong interests and expertise (affinities) that many people with autism have to help shape novel treatments for the social and communication challenges facing people with autism.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Identify the ways in which neural science is helping to refine the development of novel interventions for people with autism across the lifespan

2. Understand the development of the reward system in people with and without ASD

3. Recognize the harnessing of specific interests of people with ASD to shape treatment approaches

 

9:30 AM -10:45 AM

 

Diane M. Danis, MD, MPH
Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Private Practice

Outside the Box: Non-Traditional Approaches to Treating ADHD

This presentation provides an overview of non-pharmacologic approaches to the treatment of ADHD, with a discussion of which approaches are evidence-based.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Know the potential side effects of ADHD medications

2. Understand the importance of diagnosing and treating iron deficiency in children with ADHD symptoms

3. Understand the important role that sleep plays in ADHD diagnosis and treatment

4. Understand the importance of diagnosing and treating iron deficiency in children with ADHD symptoms

5. Understand the important role that sleep plays in ADHD diagnosis and treatment

 

William G. Sharp, PhD
Director, Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program, The Marcus Autism Center
Assistant Professor, Division of Autism and Related Disorders &
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition
Emory University School of Medicine

Sleep Disturbances in Children with ASD: Symptoms and Treatment Strategies

In addition to the core features, behavioral and medical problems are commonly observed in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which can contribute to high levels of stress and increased caregiver burden in families of children with ASD. This is especially true when co-morbidities increase the potential for detrimental behavioral and quality of life outcomes. Disrupted sleep represents a prominent concern in ASD that may negatively impact both the child and family. This presentation will review the topography, prevalence, consequences, and remediation of sleep disturbance in ASD. A detailed summary of behavioral treatment will be presented. Home and clinic-based treatment planning will be highlighted, including parent education and outpatient consultation.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Identify the topography and prevalence of sleep problems in ASD

2. Develop an understanding of the medical, developmental and behavioral factors that contribute to the emergence and maintenance of these concerns

3. Identify assessment procedures and behavioral treatment in strategies for common sleep disturbances in ASD+H24

 

10:45 AM – 11:00 AM Break*

 

11:00 AM – 12:00 Noon

 

Ellis Crasnow, PhD
Director, STEM³ Academy and STEM Education
The Help Group

STEM and Special Needs—A Revolution in Special Education

Traditionally, special education has been about what students struggle with, what they are least good at, and what their weaknesses and needs are, and not about their strengths and various areas of excellence. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) has captured the imagination of those in education, business and industry because of the deep influence that technology has had on almost every aspect of modern life, and this has led to a huge demand for ever more qualified applicants for the many technical and skills-based openings in commerce and industry. By focusing on our students’ strengths, which are often in STEM-related areas, while supporting their areas of weakness, we better prepare them for success in college, career and in life. Attendees will have a clearer understanding how a strengths-based program which develops and accelerates student learning, how integrating the curriculum with a hands-on experiential approach, and how embedding social emotional learning into the curriculum in an organic way revolutionize special education.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Have a clearer understanding how a strengths-based program develops and accelerates student learning

2. Understand how to integrate the curriculum with a hands-on experiential approach

3. Learn how embedding social-emotional learning into the curriculum in an organic way, together with the above, revolutionizes special education

 

Anshu Batra, MD, FAAP
Developmental Pediatrician, Private Practice

A Community-based Clinician’s Perspective on Evidence-based Priorities in ASD Management

This presentation will focus on the clinical management of ASD from a community based developmental pediatrician’s perspective.  It will look at “demystifying” the ASD diagnosis, identifying strengths and challenges of an individual with ASD, and then developing a multidisciplinary treatment plan.  In addition, it will look at community awareness, education, and ongoing research as important keys to improving clinical management of ASD individuals.  Finally, this talk will provide a perspective on shortcomings in our approach to current clinical management of ASD as well as a perspective on research goals that can be important in alleviating those shortcomings.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:
1. Describe the community-based developmental pediatrician’s approach to diagnosis and medical management of ASD

2. Understand that ASD is a developmental disorder of miscommunication between the brain regions

3. Understand that ASD clinical manifestations are highly heterogeneous

4. Identify ways to provide better targeted treatments and the need to identify clinical phenotypes and/or common genetic markers in ASD

5. Know where we need more emphasis and knowledge from research to improve the diagnosis and management of ASD

 

Mary Lawlor, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA
Associate Chair of Research, USC Chan Division Occupational Science and Therapy
Professor, join appointment, Keck School of Medicine, USC

Olga Solomon, PhD
Assistant Professor, USC Chan Division Occupational Science and Therapy

Leah Stein Duker, PhD, OTR/L
Research Assistant Professor, USC Chan Division Occupational Science and Therapy

Adapting Social & Sensory Environments in the Classroom, Clinic and Community for Children with Autism

The panel will include:

1. The Help Group – USC Occupational Science Initiative’s newest project to develop opportunities for advancing community-based social participation and access to science curriculum for children with autism spectrum disorders.

2. Animal – Assisted Interventions for Children with ASD in School and Community Settings: Insights from the Paws and Pals Project, and will review current research on animal-assisted interventions in school and community settings for children with ASD, and discuss the Help Group’s Paws and Pals animal-assisted intervention program.

3. Adapting the Sensory Environment at the Dentist: Decreasing Stress for Children with ASD

 

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Gain knowledge of a newly adopted pilot program aimed at fostering science learning and facilitating social engagement in the classroom, participation in the community at an experiential science museum, and helping students to better access their respective grade-level science curricula.  

2. Gain knowledge of current research findings on Animal-Assisted Interventions for children with ASD that are relevant to parents, teachers, and practitioners; learn about the Help Group’s Paw and Pals for Kids with Autism program; and outline how an Animal-Assisted Intervention program, like Paws and Pals, can help students with ASD to participate in their classroom interactions and activities, and to access their academic curriculum.

3. Gain knowledge of adapted dental environments that are more calming for children with autism spectrum disorder by addressing physiological anxiety, behavioral distress and pain intensity.

 

12:00 Noon – 1:00 PM

 

Claudia L. Kernan, PhD
Director, The Help Group-UCLA Neuropsychology Program
Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Using Neuropsychological Assessment to Help Children with Learning Difficulties Thrive: A Guide for Parents, Educators and Clinicians

This presentation is designed to help parents, educators, and clinicians understand how the pediatric neuropsychological evaluation process is used to help children with learning difficulties. Specifically, attendees will learn how to determine when it is appropriate to refer a child for a neuropsychological evaluation and what types of learning difficulties are commonly addressed through the evaluation process. Participants will learn how the evaluation provides information about a child’s brain-based strengths and weaknesses for use in identifying the underlying sources of learning problems and for tailoring educational and intervention programs to address a child’s specific needs.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Identify circumstances in which referring a child for a neuropsychological evaluation is useful for diagnostic clarification and/or education and intervention planning

2. Distinguish between a psychoeducational and neuropsychological evaluation and determine which is appropriate for the children you serve

3. List the types of learning difficulties and disorders that are most frequently addressed through information obtained in a neuropsychological examination

 

Jason Bolton, PsyD
Vice President of Programs
The Help Group

Tanya Paparella, PhD
Director, Early Childhood Partial Hospitalization Program
Health Sciences Associate Clinical Professor, UCLA Center for Autism Research and Treatment
David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

Sara McCracken, PsyD, BCBA
Director, Early Elementary Programs
The Help Group

Autism Early Intervention Doesn’t End at Age 3

The focus of the panel will be to discuss best practices for early intervention in programs that children transition to after being served by Regional Center funded Early Start programs, which end at age 3. The presentation will address the following questions: What should parents look for in a preschool program as school districts become responsible for meeting the child’s needs at that age? What other components might parents look into which may augment the responsibilities of the school district and the services and programs they provide? When to look for intensive intervention services? What are indicators of components of quality intensive intervention?

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Understand early intervention and early education options available to students on the autism spectrum after the age of 3

2. Understand what services and educational programs to consider at your child’s transition IEP

3. Emphasize and describe indicators for quality early intervention and education for young children with ASD

 

Catherine Mogil, PsyD
Clinical Director, Family Stress, Trauma and Resilience Clinic, UCLA Nathanson Family Resilience Center
Assistant Clinical Professor, Semel Insitute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, UCLA

Building Resilience for Children with Special Needs

This presentation will offer a review of family resilience factors that will set the foundation for specific strategies that parents, caregivers, and teachers can use to proactively build resilience and support children in the aftermath of trauma.

At the end of this presentation attendees will be able to:

1. Identify risk and protective factors that allow children to more easily recover from trauma or other adverse events

2. Develop strategies to promote resilience in families

3. Customize resilience-building activities to the unique needs of the child

 

*Breaks and lunch are not counted towards CE Credit

FOR PROFESSIONALS SEEKING CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS

The Help Group is pleased to offer continuing education credits for Summit 2016. According to the guidelines set forth by accrediting organizations, professionals seeking credit must sign in prior to the opening proceedings on Friday and before the first session on Saturday, and must sign out at the conclusion of each day’s program.

Please note that check-in for professionals will begin Friday and Saturday at 7:00 a.m. We encourage those seeking credits to arrive at the Skirball Cultural Center no later than 7:30 a.m. on Friday and Saturday to ensure a timely check-in. No partial credits will be given.  Continuing Education Certificates will be mailed to the address provided by the registrant following the Summit.

The instruction level of learning will range from intermediate through advanced.

 

Psychologists

The Help Group is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Help Group maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This course is eligible for up to 12 hours of continuing education credits.

(Provider #1444)

Friday = 7.5 CE credits    Saturday = 4.5 CE credits

 

Occupational Therapists

The Help Group is approved by The American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. (AOTA) to assign continuing education units for occupational therapists. This course is eligible for up to 1.2 CE units. The assignment of AOTA CE units does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products or clinical procedures by AOTA.

(Provider #6193)

Friday = .75 CEUs           Saturday = .45 CEUs

 

Social Workers & Therapists

The Help Group is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs. The Help Group (Provider #64310) maintains responsibility for this program/course and its content.

Friday = 7 CE hours         Saturday = 4 CE hours

 

Speech-Language Pathologists

This course meets the qualifications for up to 11 hours of continuing professional development credits for Speech-Language Pathologists as required by the California Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology Board.

(Provider #PDP86)

Friday = 7 CPDs  Saturday = 4 CPDs

 

Behavior Analyst Practitioners

The Help Group is an approved provider of Type 2 continuing education units by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board for BCBAs BCaBAs and BCBA-Ds. Friday’s program (Sessions 3A and 5B) qualifies for 3 Type 2 CE units and Saturday’s program (Sessions 2B and 4B) qualify for 2 Type 2 CE units. (Provider #OP-12-2163)

Friday = 3 CE units          Saturday = 2.5 CE units

 

If you have questions about continuing education, please contact:events@thehelpgroup.org or call 818.779.5212

 

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Certificates of Attendance

The Help Group provides Certificates of Attendance at the conclusion of each day’s program for attendees. If you would like a certificate, please stop by the registration table at the end of the day.

 

Grievances

The Help Group strives to provide a conference of the highest caliber for its attendees. If you have questions or concerns before or during the conference, please contact Julie Hirschberg, Director of Special Events, events@thehelpgroup.org or call 818.779.5212. Additionally, The Help Group follows the grievance procedure as outlined here by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

1A Autism Genetics: Where are We Headed

Matthew State, MD, PhD

 

2A The Role of Executive Functioning in Young People with ADHD and/or Asperger’s as They Transition to Post-Secondary Schooling or Workplace

Thomas E. Brown, PhD

 

2B Toward Understanding Girls with Autism: A Researcher & Parent Perspective

Kevin Pelphrey, PhD

 

 

 

3B Early Identification in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Sally Ozonoff, PhD

 

4A Anxiety in Children with ADHD and Learning Disabilities

John Piacentini, PhD, ABPP

 

4B Cognitive and Socio-emotional Resilience in individuals with Dyslexia

Fumiko Hoeft MD, PhD


4C Optimizing Services for Bicultural and Bilingual Latino Children with Special Needs and their Families

Xavier E. Cagigas, PhD

 

5A Translating Scientific Research into Real World Practice: The Help Group – UCLA Autism Research Alliance

The Help Group-UCLA Autism Research Alliance

Amanda Gulsrud, PhD

Elizabeth Laugeson, PsyD

Katherine Stavropoulos, PhD

 

5B Assessment and Treatment of Feeding and Gastrointestinal Problems in Children with ASD

William G. Sharp, PhD

 

5C Pharmacological Management of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Michael Enenbach, MD

 

6A How the Reading Brain Reframes our Concept of Dyslexia and Its Intervention

Maryanne Wolf, PhD

 

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15

 

1A Rethinking ADD/ADHD: How It Develops, Sometimes Gets Better and Sometimes Gets Worse

Thomas E. Brown, PhD
 

1B Harnessing Affinities to Gain an Understanding of Autism

Kevin Pelphrey, PhD

 

2A Outside the Box: Non-Traditional Approaches to Treating ADHD

Diane M. Danis, MD, MPH

 

2B Sleep Disturbances in Children with ASD: Symptoms and Treatment Strategies

William G. Sharp, PhD

 

3A STEM and Special Needs—A Revolution in Special Education

Ellis Crasnow, PhD

 

3B A Community-based Clinician’s Perspective on Evidence-based Priorities in ASD Management

Anshu Batra, MD, FAAP

 

3C Adapting Social & Sensory Environments in the Classroom, Clinic and Community for Children with Autism

Mary Lawlor, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Olga Solomon, PhD 

Leah Stein Duker, PhD, OTR/L

 

4A Using Neuropsychological Assessment to Help Children with Learning Difficulties Thrive: A Guide for Parents, Educators and Clinicians

Claudia L. Kernan, PhD

 

4B Autism Early Intervention Doesn’t End at Age 3

Jason Bolton, PsyD

Tanya Paparella, PhD

Sara McCracken, PsyD, BCBA

 

4C Building Resilience for Children with Special Needs

Catherine Mogil, PsyD