Summit 2017

ABOUT OUR SUMMIT

The Help Group’s Summit 2017 is a cutting edge conference that features leading experts in basic and applied research, and evidence-based best practices in assessment, intervention and treatment. Widely recognized for the scope, depth and caliber of its offerings, the Summit is designed for educators, clinicians/therapists and parents. Each year, the program provides a rich and informative experience to its attendees. We look forward to you joining us.

SUMMIT CHAIRS

REGISTRATION

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Stephen Hinshaw, PhD
Professor of Psychology,
UC Berkeley, Vice Chair of Psychology,
Dept.of Psychiatry UC San Francisco

Lonnie Zwaigenbaum, MD
Adjunct Associate Professor
AHFMR Health Scholar, Co-director – Autism Research Centre,
Associate Professor – Department of Pediatrics
University of Alberta

Jack Fletcher, PhD
Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Distinguished University Professor
University of Houston

John Elder Robison
New York Times
Best-Selling Author,
Speaker, Educator and Advocate

Friday October 13

 

7:00 – 7:45 Check-in and Breakfast

 

7:45 – 8:00 Opening Proceedings

 

8:00 – 9:15

 

1 – Keynote Speaker

Pushing the Boundaries of Early Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Lonnie Zwaigenbaum, MD

Adjunct Associate Professor

AHFMR Health Scholar, Co-director – Autism Research Centre, Associate Professor – Department of Pediatrics

University of Alberta

 

9:15 – 10:30

 

2A – On the Road to Precision Health: Biomarkers and Clinical Trials in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Shafali Jeste, MD

Associate Professor in Psychiatry,

Neurology and Pediatrics

University of California, Los Angeles

David Geffen School of Medicine,

Center for Autism Research and Treatment

 

2B – Literacy in the Digital Age: Supporting and Engaging Adolescents with Learning Disabilities

Penelope Collins, PhD

Associate Professor, School of Education,

University of California, Irvine

 

2C – Assessment of Bilingual Children with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: Update and Recommendations for Parents and Professionals

Marian Williams, PhD

Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics

University of Southern California

Amanda Tyree, M.A., CCC-SLP

Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

University of Southern California

Keck School of Medicine

 

10:30 – 10:45 Break*

 

10:45 – 12:00

 

3A – Endowing Socially Assistive Robots with the Ability To Help Young People with Autism and Other Special Needs

Maja J. Matarić, PhD

Chan Soon-Shiong Professor of Computer Science, Neuroscience, and Pediatrics,

University of Southern California

 

3B – Autism In Girls: Understanding the Female Protective Effect and Role of Sex-Differential Biology in Risk for Autism

Donna Werling, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar,

University of California, San Francisco

School of Medicine

 

12:00 – 1:00 Lunch*

 

1:00 – 2:15

 

4A – Examining Early Social and Cognitive Development in Infant Siblings of Children with ASD

Mirella Dapretto, PhD

Professor,University of California, Los Angeles

Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences

 

4B – Resiliency in Youth With ADHD: Evidence and Prediction

Steve Lee, PhD

Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

Department of Psychology

 

2:15 – 3:30

 

5A – Toward A Better Understanding of Social & Motor Deficits in Children with ASD

Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, PhD

Associate Professor, Joint Appointment with the Department of Psychology at the USC Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

 

5B – Diagnosing Dyslexia: Reading Between the Lines

Lorie Humphrey, PhD

Child and Adolescent Neuropsychologist

 

5C – thinkSMARTer, not Harder: The Keys to Cultivating Executive Functioning Skills at Home and in the Classroom

Alissa Ellis, PhD

Clinical Neuropsychologist, Health Sciences Assistant, Clinical Professor, Semel Institute of Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles

 

3:30 – 3:45 Break*

 

3:45 – 5:00

 

6 – Keynote Speaker

The Latest Findings on ADHD – Especially Girls and Women

Stephen Hinshaw, PhD

Professor of Psychology,

UC Berkeley; Vice Chair for Psychology,

Department of Psychiatry UC San Francisco

 

Saturday October 14 

 

7:30 – 8:30 Check-in and Breakfast

 

8:30 – 9:45

 

1A – Special Presentation

Life with Autism: A Different Perspective

John Elder Robison

New York Times

Best-Selling Author,

Speaker, Educator and Advocate

 

1B – Keynote Speaker

Understanding Dyslexia and Its Implications for Identification and Treatment

Jack Fletcher, PhD

Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen

Distinguished University Professor,

University of Houston

 

9:45 – 10:45

 

2A – The Challenge and Opportunity of Neurodiversity: A Community Approach

John Elder Robison

New York Times

Best-Selling Author,

Speaker, Educator and Advocate

 

2B – Mental Health Stigma & Families:

The Next Frontier

Stephen Hinshaw, PhD

Professor of Psychology,

University of California, Berkeley

 

11:00 – 12:00

 

3A – Modifying Pivotal Response Treatment to Jump- Start Social Development in Toddlers with ASD

Ty Vernon, PhD

Director, Koegel Autism Center

Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology,

University of California, Santa Barbara

 

3B – Strengths and Opportunities in STEM—Autism in the School and the Workplace

Ellis Crasnow, PhD

Director, STEM3 Academy and STEM Education,

The Help Group

Gray Benoist Sr.

Principal, MindSpark

David R. Ewart Jr., MEd

Principal of STEM3 Academy, Valley Glen

Amy Griffiths, PhD

Assistant Professor,

Attallah College of Educational Studies,

Chapman University

 

12:00 – 1:00

 

4A – Q&A: Exploring a Developmental Pediatrician’s Perspective on Autism and ADHD

Josh Mandelberg, MD, FAAP

Developmental-Behavorial Pediatrician,

Private Practice

Jason Bolton, PsyD

Moderator

Vice President of Programs

The Help Group

 

4BUsing Technology to Build Core Vocabulary and Meaningful Exchanges – Beginning with the End in Mind

Lois Jean Brady, CCC-SLP

Speech Pathologist, Assistive Technology Specialist

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

7:00 AM – 7:45 AM
Check-in & Continental Breakfast

7:45 AM – 8:00 AM
Opening Proceedings

8:00 AM – 9:15 AM

Lonnie Zwaigenbaum, MD
Adjunct Associate Professor, AHFMR Health Scholar, Co-director – Autism Research Centre, Associate Professor – Department of Pediatrics University of Alberta

Pushing the Boundaries of Early Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Level/Audience: Intermediate/General
The goals of this session are to orient attendees to advances in early detection and diagnosis of ASD, including the potential for identification of infant and toddlers at risk as symptoms first emerge. The presentation will also emphasize the diversity among individuals with ASD, and the implications for symptom detection and diagnosis, as well as the broader health systems issues that influence timing of diagnosis. The concept of ‘timely diagnosis’ will be introduced; that is, ensuring the diagnostic process is responsive to family concerns and not delayed by bottlenecks in the service system, but might still vary based on characteristics of the individual. The approach of starting interventions for functional impairments even prior to establishing categorical diagnoses will also be discussed, as will the unique challenges of assessing older youth and adults.
At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Recite 5 behavioral features detectable in infants at risk that can precede full expression of ASD symptoms.
2. List child and family factors currently associated with timing of ASD diagnosis, and strategies that could help lower the average age of diagnosis
3. Evaluate advantages and disadvantages of assessment models for ASD, and consider how to improve diagnostic capacity in their own communities

9:15 AM – 10:30 AM

Shafali Jeste, MD
Associate Professor in Psychiatry,Neurology and Pediatrics University of California,
Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine, Center for Autism Research and Treatment

2A- On the Road to Precision Health: Biomarkers and Clinical Trials in Autism Spectrum Disorder
Level/Audience: Intermediate/General

The presentation will start with an overall discussion about biomarkers and the reasons that we are trying to identify brain based biomarkers in ASD. I then will introduce EEG as a tool to study brain based biomarkers in ASD and share data from studies of ASD biomarkers in three key areas: Early risk prediction (studies of high risk infants), heterogeneity within the autism spectrum and genetically defined subgroups within ASD. Finally, I will discuss the challenges around clinical trial design and development in neurodevelopmental disorders and consider the ways in which more objective measures of brain function can improve clinical trials in ASD.

Outline
1. Overall discussion about biomarkers
a. The reasons that we are trying to identify brain based biomarkers in ASD.
2. Introduce EEG as a tool to study brain based biomarkers in ASD
a. Share data from studies of ASD biomarkers in three key areas: Early risk prediction (studies of high risk infants), heterogeneity within the autism spectrum and genetically defined subgroups within ASD.
3. Discuss the challenges around clinical trial design and development in neurodevelopmental disorders and
4. Consider the ways in which more objective measures of brain function can improve clinical trials in ASD.

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Describe the term biomarker, the reason that biomarkers are needed in ASD, and identify the challenges in developing biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
2. Explain why electroencephalography (EEG) sheds light on brain function in ASD
3. Analyze the challenges in clinical trials in ASD and why these inherent challenges lead to “failure” of these trials.

Penelope Collins, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Education,
University of California, Irvine

2B – Literacy in the Digital Age: Supporting and Engaging Adolescents with Learning Disabilities

Level/Audience: Intermediate/General
Based on the Expectancy Value theory of motivation, attendees will be given an overview of evidence-based strategies for supporting literacy skills and engagement using digital tools.
Outline
1. Background: Social and emotional consequences of learning disabilities
2. Understanding motivation
a. Misconceptions about motivation
b. Expectancy Value theory of motivation
c. The role of motivation on engagement and achievement
3. Principles of Universal Design for Learning and its relation with motivation
a. Promotion of expectancies for success
b. Promotion of value of literacy
4. How digital tools can reflect UDL and motivation
a. Making challenging content accessible
b. Just-in-time support or scaffolding
c. High interest materials that are relevant to adolescents
d. Promoting student choice and autonomy
5. Examples of digital tools for reading and writing
a. Supporting decoding with Live Ink
b. Supporting close reading with Amplify
c. Supporting reading and writing with Udio
6. Conclusions: Digital tools can play a role in supporting adolescents with learning disabilities both in developing literacy skills and in promoting motivation.

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Describe the Expectancy Value theory of motivation, and how it applies to the literacy practices of adolescents with learning disabilities
2. Recite the principles of Universal Design for Learning
3. Identify digital tools and resources to support literacy skills and engagement for adolescents with learning disabilities.

 

Marian Williams, PhD, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics University of Southern California
Amanda Tyree, M.A., CCC-SLP, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine

2C – Assessment of Bilingual Children with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: Update and
Level/Audience: Intermediate/General

This presentation will provide research updates and recommendations for professionals and parents regarding bilingual children, including those with autism and other developmental disabilities. Information will be provided about (1) communication development in children exposed to two languages, (2) considerations for professionals when assessing bilingual children, including the perspectives of psychologists and speech-language pathologists, and (3) recommendations for parents, educators, and other professionals about how to support families in maintaining the home language for children with and without developmental disabilities.

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

1. List research findings related to bilingual language development in young children with autism and other developmental disabilities.
2. Explain the factors to consider when assessing a bilingual child.
3. Discuss how to support families in maintaining the home language for children with and without developmental disabilities.

 

10:30 – 10:45 Break*

 

10:45 – 12:00

Maja J. Matarić, PhD
Professor and Chan Soon-Shion Chair Computer Science, Neuroscience and Pediatrics Vice Dean for Research, Viterbi School of Engineering, Founding Director; USC Robotics and Autonomous Systems Center Director, USC Robotics Research Lab; Founder, Chief Science Officer, Embodied, Inc

3A – Endowing Socially Assistive Robots with the Ability To Help Young People with Autism and Other Special Needs

TBD

 

Donna Werling, PhD ,
Postdoctoral Scholar , University of California,
San Francisco School of Medicine

3B – Autism In Girls: Understanding the Female Protective Effect and Role of Sex-Differential Biology in Risk for Autism

Level/Audience: Intermediate/General

This presentation will summarize what is currently known about differences in the risk and prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in males versus females, key questions regarding the origins of these differences, and what we stand to gain from better understanding the role of sex-differential biology in ASD. We will focus on the “female protective effect” model of autism risk, including a description of the conceptual framework behind this model, how scientists use this model to generate hypotheses and design experiments, and current supporting evidence from genetic and epidemiological studies. We will then review in detail published studies and work in progress that use gene expression data from human brain tissue to characterize the relationship between autism biology and typical sex differences in neurobiology. Results from these studies suggest a role for specific neural cell types in the biological processes that link sex differences and autism risk, highlighting a path forward for future research.

Educational goals:
• Understand what current evidence shows about the relative numbers of males and females with autism diagnoses
• Recognize why more detailed knowledge about the biological processes that shape male and female risk for autism could be useful for patients and their families
• Understand what is meant by the female protective effect model, how researchers use this model to make and test predictions, and what study results suggest about the validity of these predictions
• Highlight a genomics/bioinformatics approach for identifying the key biological processes that are implicated in autism and that differ between the sexes at baseline
• Understand how gene expression data implicates microglia and astrocytes in male-typical and autistic neurobiology

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Define estimates of autism prevalence in males and females (male:female sex ratios) and the impact of ascertainment and methodology on these estimates
2. Explain the female protective effect model and the predictions can be made and tested from this model
3. Describe the results from genetic and epidemiological studies that support, or fail to support, the female protective effect model

 

12:00 – 1:00 Lunch*

 

1:00 – 2:15

Mirella Dapretto, PhD
Professor,University of California, Los Angeles
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences

4A – Examining Early Social and Cognitive Development in Infant Siblings of Children with ASD

Level/Audience: Intermediate/General
The overarching goal of this lecture is to provide a thorough review of the extant literature on early neuroimaging markers of risk for ASD which examined brain development in infant siblings of children with ASD. Characterizing the early developmental trajectories of infants at high familial risk for ASD can offer new
insights into the neural mechanisms conferring greater risk for ASD and ultimately pave the way for early interventions that may stir development along more normative trajectories. This lecture will present findings from a growing number of structural and functional brain imaging studies in infants at high and low risk for
ASD which sought to identify early biomarkers of ASD with the ultimate goal of predicting future developmental outcome.

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

1. Describe a summary of current work in this area by presenting key findings about structural and functional brain development in the first two years of life in infants at high risk for ASD (as compared to low risk controls)
2. Recite the potential, as well as the intrinsic limitations, of early neuroimaging markers of risk for ASD, to inform later diagnosis as well as our understanding of the neurobiology of ASD

 

Steve Lee, PhD
Professor, University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Psychology

 

4B – Resiliency in Youth With ADHD: Evidence and Prediction

 

Level/Audience: Intermediate/General

This presentation begins with an overview on what is known about resilient outcomes among youth with ADHD. The presentation will synthesize recent results from multiple longitudinal studies, from both clinic-referred and population-based samples, that speak to the persistent nature of ADHD and its related challenges. I will also refer to knowledge about predictors of resilience (e.g., family, academic, clinical) that should be an important part of clinical assessment of children and families.

Educational goals:
The educational goal for this presentation is to discuss the concept of resilience in youth ADHD. The presenter will discuss challenges in defining resilience across mental health, academic, and socio-emotional domains, especially across development. A second focus will be on what is known about the best predictors of resilience in youth ADHD, highlighting modifiable factors that represent logical targets for intervention.
At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Define the key criteria that must be satisfied in the definition of resilience in youth ADHD;
2. Articulate how these criteria change from childhood to adolescence to adulthood;
3. Discuss the early factors that best predictors youth who show resilient outcomes in adolescence and early adulthood.

 

2:15 – 3:30

Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, PhD,
Associate Professor, Joint Appointment with the Department of Psychology at the USC Dana and
David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

5A – Toward A Better Understanding of Social & Motor Deficits in Children with ASD
TBD

Lorie Humphrey, PhD
Child and Adolescent Neuropsychologist

5B – Diagnosing Dyslexia: Reading Between the Lines

Level: Professionals engaged in assessment of student with dyslexia and ADHD, including applications for accommodations for high-stakes testing (such as college boards).

Dyslexia (a.k.a. Reading Disorder, RD) is the most researched learning disorder, as well as being one of the most widespread (5-15% of school age children per the DSM-5). Despite its prevalence, as well as its (often) easily-recognized symptoms, the process of diagnosing dyslexia is not necessarily straightforward. While practical models such as “response to treatment” (Fletcher, et al, 2007) have significantly improved the likelihood that school-age children will receive treatment, other venues, such as qualifying for accommodations for high-stakes testing such as college boards, continue to relay on the “discrepancy model,” an approach that is vulnerable to under-identification.

This presentation will take a closer look at current use of the “discrepancy model” for identifying reading disorders. The first section will provide information about dyslexia in general, including evolutionary questions, its significance historically, and differences in its presentation across different languages. The second section will look at ways of diagnosing dyslexia, with special emphasis on the “discrepancy model.” Additionally this section will provide information about how symptoms of other, co-existing disorders (such as ADHD) can impact scores, and potentially interfere with diagnostic clarity in terms of RD and other challenges.

General Outline of the Presentation
1. Description of Primary Features of Dyslexia,
2. Clinical presentation of dyslexia at different ages
3. Assessing dyslexia
4. Potential impact of co-morbidities (i.e., ADHD) on clarity of RD diagnosis

Goals:

1. Participants will be able to list specific skills that are at risk in people with dyslexia

2. Participants will be able to list co-existing challenges in students with dyslexia that may affect whether they are correctly identified and diagnosed.

3. Participants will be able to state the names of 3 reading tests known to be sensitive to dyslexia in high-functioning individuals

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

1. Exhibit mastery in their ability to state core symptoms of dyslexia, and explain why these particular skills may be vulnerable.
2. Display mastery in their knowledge of disorders that often co-exist in people with dyslexia, as well as their understanding of how those symptoms may interfere with the diagnosis of dyslexia
3. Exhibit mastery in terms of understanding specific methods for measuring them using cognitive tests.

 

Alissa Ellis, PhD
Clinical Neuropsychologist, Health Sciences Assistant, Clinical Professor,
Semel Institute of Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles

5C – thinkSMARTer, not Harder: The Keys to Cultivating Executive Functioning Skills at Home and in the Classroom

Level: The presentation will be presented at a level that is appropriate for both parents and clinicians (or others who work with kids).
Presentation Description: This will be a power-point presentation that combines recent research with practical skills to enhance executive functioning.
Outline: The outline of the presentation will be to
1. Define executive functions
2. Describe why they are important to overall success
3. Highlight how they can be negatively affected
4. Review literature on the current treatments for EF weaknesses
5. Introduce the thinkSMART program
6. Show data from the program
7. Review skills/key points for its effectiveness

Educational Goals: The broad goals of the presentation are to highlight the importance of executive functioning skills in overall life success, identify the key considerations and obstacles of working with youths with EF weaknesses, and present practical strategies for overcoming executive functioning difficulties.

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Analyze what is meant by executive functions
2. Describe how weaknesses in executive functioning are related to life success
3. List strategies aimed at improving executive functioning in youth

3:30 – 3:45 Break*

 

3:45 – 5:00

 

Stephen Hinshaw, PhD
Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley; Vice Chair for Psychology,
Department of Psychiatry UC San Francisco

6 – The Latest Findings on ADHD – Especially Girls and Women

Level/Audience: Intermediate/General
The presentation will begin with a brief overview of current controversies related to ADHD, including its rising prevalence and the need for evidence-based assessment procedures, before focusing on heritable vulnerability along with current knowledge of environmental forces that accentuate such genetic liability. The key focus will be on girls with ADHD, featuring longitudinal data from the presenter’s Berkeley Girls with ADHD Longitudinal Study (BGALS), the largest study of girls with ADHD in existence, now followed until their late 20s. Information on academic, vocational, social, and health-related outcomes will follow, including the huge risk for unplanned pregnancy and for self-harm in this sample. Mediators of such outcomes will be featured, along with the need for evidence-based interventions.

Goals: The audience will understand the combinations of genetic vulnerability and environmental risk (ranging from toxins to maltreatment) in shaping the onset and development of ADHD, with particular focus on the presenter’s large longitudinal study of girls with ADHD, who have now been followed into their mid-to-late 20s.

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Describe the current societal context surrounding ADHD, including its rising prevalence rates.
2. Explain the strongly heritable nature of ADHD dimensions of behavior with current knowledge about environmental risk factors that potentiate such genetic liability, including teratogens, toxins, and maltreatment,
3. Analyze information regarding the under-developed issues surrounding girls with ADHD, including reasons for their lowered prevalence, their huge risk for such key impairments as self-injury and unplanned pregnancy as they develop, and the need to engage them and their families in evidence-based interventions.

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15

7:00 AM – 8:30 AM
Check-in & Continental Breakfast

 

John Elder Robison
New York Times Best-Selling Author, Speaker, Educator and Advocate

1A – Special Presentation -Life with Autism: A Different Perspective

TBD

 

Jack Fletcher, PhD
Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Distinguished University Professor, University of Houston

1B – Keynote – Understanding Dyslexia and Its Implications for Identification and Treatment

Level/Audience: Intermediate/General
In the past year, there has been a concerted effort to highlight dyslexia as a specific learning disability, with attempts to introduce special provisions in the legislation reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Many states have passed legislation requiring schools to identify students with dyslexia and provide them with interventions specific to dyslexia. With these public policy issues in the background, this presentation will discuss a scientific view of dyslexia as a well-understood form of learning disability with specific reading, cognitive, neural, and genetic characteristics. However, the attributes of dyslexia are dimensional, not categorical. Therefore, precise estimates of prevalence are relative to the adopted criteria. It is difficult to differentiate children with dyslexia from children with word reading and spelling difficulties who may be lower in intelligence, have comorbid problems with math or ADHD on reading and neural characteristics. There is little evidence of dyslexia-specific interventions, although explicit instruction in the alphabetic principle as early in schooling as possible is essential for any student with problems acquiring word reading and spelling skills. Like other learning disabilities, dyslexia is real, interferes with adaptation, and has prominent neurobiological correlates. But the neural systems are malleable and many students can overcome the reading problem with early intervention. Intractability to instruction makes dyslexia unexpected, not a cognitive discrepancy.
Outline
I. Background: Recent public policy initiatives
II. Definition and prevalence of dyslexia
III. Role of IQ and cognitive assessments
IV. Specificity and comorbidity
V. Causes of Dyslexia
a. Neural correlates
b. Genetic factors
c. Environmental factors
d. Instruction
VI. Treatment
a. The importance of early intervention
b. Intense remedial efforts
c. Integrating through a Multi-tiered System of Supports (MTSS)
d. Dyslexia as intractability to effective intervention
VI. Conclusions: Children with dyslexia are hard to teach, not unable to learn

Learning Goals
1. Understand research on dyslexia and its implications for identification and treatment
2. Appreciate the role of academic and cognitive assessments in identification and evaluation
3. Understand dimensional concepts of learning disabilities

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Define and identify dyslexia
2. Indicate general principles whereby how dyslexia is treated though early intervention and remediation
3. Articulate the role of neuroscience and genetics as causes of dyslexia

 

9:45 – 10:45

 

John Elder Robison
New York Times Best-Selling Author, Speaker, Educator and Advocate

2A – The Challenge and Opportunity of Neurodiversity: A Community Approach

TBD

 

Stephen Hinshaw, PhD, Professor of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley

2B – Mental Health Stigma & Families: The Next Frontier

Level/Audience: Intermediate/General

The presentation will begin with information about the still-high rates of stigma that pertain to mental health in the 21st century, defining the key components of stigma (stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination; self-stigma and associated stigma). A deep narrative of the presenter’s family will then take place, emphasizing the need for openness rather than shame and silence about mental illness in parents and in children. The presentation will conclude with an outline of strategies designed to reduce stigmatization.

Goals: The audience will understand the huge gap between mental health knowledge and mental health attitudes in the U.S. (and abroad), and come away with a deeper appreciation of the shame and stigma that still pertain to child, adolescent, and parent mental illness.

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Compile information on the gap between the continuing improvements in mental health knowledge in the U.S. across the past half-century vs. the lagging attitudinal change regarding mental health conditions during that time span.
2. Comprehend the multiple levels constituting mental health stigma: stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination.
3. Discuss the related concepts of internalized stigma and associated (courtesy) stigma.

 

11:00 – 12:00

 

Ty Vernon, PhD
Director, Koegel Autism Center, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara

3A – Modifying Pivotal Response Treatment to Jump- Start Social Development in Toddlers with ASD

Level/Audience: Beginning – Intermediate/General
This presentation focuses on the evolution and current research of the Pivotal Response Treatment model, an autism intervention that combines strength-based motivational strategies with behavioral techniques to transform child development. Specifically, this presentation will focus on methods that parents and clinicians can use to foster interpersonal engagement and accrue critical social momentum with young children with ASD. Practical strategies, video examples, and evidence from single subject research and randomized controlled trials will be highlighted.

Outline of Presentation:
• History and Development of PRT
• Core Principles of PRT
• Social Reinforcement and PRT
• Evidence from Recent Research
• Future Directions

Educational/Learning Goals:
• Attendees will be able to articulate core principles of the PRT model
• Attendees will understand how to modify PRT to directly target social engagement

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Implement PRT child choice procedures
2. Implement PRT clear opportunity procedures
3. Describe how to implement PRT social reinforcement procedures

 

Ellis Crasnow, PhD
Director, STEM³ Academy and STEM Education, The Help Group

Gray Benoist Sr.
Principal, MindSpark

David R. Ewart Jr., MEd
Principal of STEM3 Academy, Valley Glen

Amy Griffiths, PhD
Assistant Professor, Attallah College of Educational Studies, Chapman University

3B – Strengths and Opportunities in STEM—Autism in the School and the Workplace

Level/Audience: Beginning – Intermediate/General
At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:
1. Discuss the present dynamic which limits success for young adults on the autism spectrum.
2. List new strategies for improving the integration of those on the spectrum into the workforce Goals.
3. Explain college and career possibilities for those on the spectrum given their strengths

 

12:00 – 1:00

 

Josh Mandelberg, MD, FAAP
Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician,
Private Practice

Jason Bolton, PsyD
Moderator
Vice President of Programs
The Help Group

4A – Q&A: Exploring a Developmental Pediatrician’s Perspective on Autism and ADHD

TBD
Lois Jean Brady, CCC-SLP, Speech Pathologist, Assistive Technology Specialist
4B – Using Technology to Build Core Vocabulary and Meaningful Exchanges – Beginning with the End in Mind

Level/Audience: Intermediate/General

This presentation will demonstrate strategies that use apps and technology to build speech, language, functional communication, literacy, and quality of life for students on the autism spectrum by beginning with the end in mind. By focusing on high frequency, core vocabulary combined with literacy skills, and a vision of the end results, we can build life-long communication skills.

Outline
Communication – AAC
• Expressive language
• Grid
• Scene Display
• Text-to-Speech
• Choosing the Right App for AAC
Core/Fringe Vocabulary
• What is Core Vocabulary
• Strategies to teach core vocabulary
• Evidence Based Practice (table)
Language
• Verbs
• Emotions
• Building Self-Monitoring Skills
• Language Strategies for Autism
Literacy
• Words
• Phrases
• Keyboard
• Writing
Accessories
• Cases
• Stylus
Information & Support
• Where to get more information
• Foundations that give grants
• References

At the end of this session, attendees will be able to:

1. Identify 30+ apps, and possess a reference list, that promote communication, literacy, speech production, language, concept development, and independence.
2. Describe the basic operation of an iDevice and iOS five main accessibility features
3. Explain how technology and the iPad fit into 22 Evidence Based Practices

FOR PROFESSIONALS SEEKING CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS

The Help Group is pleased to offer continuing education credits for Summit 2017. According to the guidelines set forth by accrediting organizations, professionals seeking credit must sign in prior to the opening proceedings on Friday and before the first session on Saturday, and must sign out at the conclusion of each day’s program.

Please note that check-in for professionals will begin Friday and Saturday at 7:00 a.m. We encourage those seeking credits to arrive at the Skirball Cultural Center no later than 7:30 a.m. on Friday and Saturday to ensure a timely check-in. No partial credits will be given.  Continuing Education Certificates will be mailed to the address provided by the registrant following the Summit.

The instruction level of learning will range from intermediate through advanced.

 

Psychologists

The Help Group is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Help Group maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This course is eligible for up to 11.75 hours of continuing education credits.

(Provider #1444)

Friday = 7.5 CE credits    Saturday = 4.25 CE credits

 

Occupational Therapists

The Help Group is approved by The American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. (AOTA) to assign continuing education units for occupational therapists. This course is eligible for up to 1.15 CE units. The assignment of AOTA CE units does not imply endorsement of specific course content, products or clinical procedures by AOTA.

(Provider #6193)

Friday = .75 CEUs           Saturday = .40 CEUs

 

Social Workers & Therapists

The Help Group is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs. The Help Group (Provider #64310) maintains responsibility for this program/course and its content.

Friday = 7 CE hours         Saturday = 4 CE hours

 

Speech-Language Pathologists

This course meets the qualifications for up to 11.5 hours of continuing professional development credits for Speech-Language Pathologists as required by the California Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology Board.

(Provider #PDP86)

Friday = 7.5 CPDs  Saturday = 4 CPDs

 

If you have questions about continuing education, please contact:events@thehelpgroup.org or call 818.779.5212

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Certificates of Attendance

The Help Group provides Certificates of Attendance at the conclusion of each day’s program for attendees. If you would like a certificate, please stop by the registration table at the end of the day.

 

Grievances

The Help Group strives to provide a conference of the highest caliber for its attendees. If you have questions or concerns before or during the conference, please contact Julie Hirschberg, Director of Special Events, events@thehelpgroup.org or call 818.779.5212. Additionally, The Help Group follows the grievance procedure as outlined here by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists.

LOCATION

HOTEL RECOMMENDATIONS
LUXE HOTEL
For Reservations Call 310.476.6571
11461 Sunset Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90049

ACCESSIBILITY
The Help Group is committed to making Summit 2016 accessible to all individuals. If you anticipate needing assistance while at the conference, please contact events@thehelpgroup.org, no later than October, 3.

COMPLIMENTARY EVENT PARKING
Renowned for its architectural design and naturalistic setting, the Skirball Cultural Center is a unique and inviting site for a conference. Located on more than 15 acres, it has been home to The Help Group’s Summit for the past nine years.

SUMMIT 2017 REFUND DISCLAIMER

The Help Group reserves the right to change elements of the Summit. Refunds will be made if a written request is received by October 9, 2017. Registration fees will be refunded less a $25.00 processing charge. No refunds will be made after October 7, 2017.